Lace Web Weavers
The Phyxelididae, the lace web weavers, are one of the families of spiders to have appeared on the scene in recent years as a result of the collapse of the ‘amaurobioids’. They are a family of smallish spiders found mostly in eastern Africa (including Madagascar). A single species, Phyxelida anatolica, is found in Cyprus and southeast Turkey, and the genus Vytfutia includes two species found in Sumatra and Borneo.
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Male of the Madagascan Ambohima sublima, with enlarged inset of the clasping apparatus of metatarsus I, from Griswold et al. (2012).

Lace Web Weavers

The Phyxelididae, the lace web weavers, are one of the families of spiders to have appeared on the scene in recent years as a result of the collapse of the ‘amaurobioids’. They are a family of smallish spiders found mostly in eastern Africa (including Madagascar). A single species, Phyxelida anatolica, is found in Cyprus and southeast Turkey, and the genus Vytfutia includes two species found in Sumatra and Borneo.
(continue)

Male of the Madagascan Ambohima sublima, with enlarged inset of the clasping apparatus of metatarsus I, from Griswold et al. (2012).

Reblogged from mabelmoments  666 notes
mabelmoments:

Picture: Piotr Naskrecki
Goliath bird eating spider (Theraphosa blondi). The largest (by mass) spider in the world, reaching the weight of 170g and leg span of 30cm. Observed by RAP scientists in Guyana in 2006. They live in burrows on the floor of lowland rainforests and despite the name feed primarily on invertebrates (but have been observed eating small mammals, lizards and even venomous snakes).

mabelmoments:

Picture: Piotr Naskrecki

Goliath bird eating spider (Theraphosa blondi). The largest (by mass) spider in the world, reaching the weight of 170g and leg span of 30cm. Observed by RAP scientists in Guyana in 2006. They live in burrows on the floor of lowland rainforests and despite the name feed primarily on invertebrates (but have been observed eating small mammals, lizards and even venomous snakes).