3D image of a nitrogen atom in graphene via @nereide
In monolayer graphene, substitutional doping during growth can be used to alter its electronic properties. We used scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and first principles calculations to characterize individual nitrogen dopants in monolayer graphene grown on a copper substrate. Individual nitrogen atoms were incorporated as graphitic dopants, and a fraction of the extra electron on each nitrogen atom was delocalized into the graphene lattice. The electronic structure of nitrogen-doped graphene was strongly modified only within a few lattice spacings of the site of the nitrogen dopant. These findings show that chemical doping is a promising route to achieving high-quality graphene films with a large carrier concentration.
Zhao L., He R., Rim K.T., Schiros T., Kim K.S., Zhou H., Gutierrez C., Chockalingam S.P., Arguello C.J. & Palova L. &  (2011). Visualizing Individual Nitrogen Dopants in Monolayer Graphene, Science, 333 (6045) 999-1003. DOI: 10.1126/science.1208759 (arxiv)

3D image of a nitrogen atom in graphene via @nereide

In monolayer graphene, substitutional doping during growth can be used to alter its electronic properties. We used scanning tunneling microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, x-ray spectroscopy, and first principles calculations to characterize individual nitrogen dopants in monolayer graphene grown on a copper substrate. Individual nitrogen atoms were incorporated as graphitic dopants, and a fraction of the extra electron on each nitrogen atom was delocalized into the graphene lattice. The electronic structure of nitrogen-doped graphene was strongly modified only within a few lattice spacings of the site of the nitrogen dopant. These findings show that chemical doping is a promising route to achieving high-quality graphene films with a large carrier concentration.

Zhao L., He R., Rim K.T., Schiros T., Kim K.S., Zhou H., Gutierrez C., Chockalingam S.P., Arguello C.J. & Palova L. & (2011). Visualizing Individual Nitrogen Dopants in Monolayer Graphene, Science, 333 (6045) 999-1003. DOI: (arxiv)

Nanomushroom via @MCHScience

This “nanomushroom” happened to grow among a field of nanowires. Researchers grow many types of nanostructures, some for their intrinsic properties, and others as tools. The Electron Transfer group at New Mexico State University grows their nanowires to help probe the electron transfer properties of organic molecules. The mushroom may not be quite what they were looking for, but it is a great example of the range of shapes nanostructures can come in.

Credit: Credit Pavel Takmakov, Ivan Vlassiuok and Sergei Smirnov

The self-assembly(1, 2)and the evolution(3)of a molecular nanowheel

Or, in other words, the creation of life-like cells from metal: Leroy Cronin and his team have try to demonstrate that life could be born also from metal atoms.

There is every possibility that there are life forms out there which aren’t based on carbon, On Mercury, the materials are all different. There might be a creature made of inorganic elements.
(Tadashi Sugawara, University of Tokyo)

(1) Haralampos N. Miras, Geoffrey J. T. Cooper, De-Liang Long, Hartmut Bögge, Achim Müller, Carsten Streb, Leroy Cronin (2010). Unveiling the Transient Template in the Self-Assembly of a Molecular Oxide Nanowheel Science, 327 (5961), 72-74 DOI: 10.1126/science.1181735
(2) Johannes Thiel, Pedro I. Molina, Mark D. Symes, Leroy Cronin (2012). Insights into the Self-Assembly Mechanism of the Modular Polyoxometalate “Keggin-Net” Family of Framework Materials and Their Electronic Properties Crystal growth and design, 12 (2), 902-908 DOI: 10.1021/cg201342z
(3) Haralampos N. Miras, Craig J. Richmond, De-Liang Long, Leroy Cronin (2012). Solution-Phase Monitoring of the Structural Evolution of a Molybdenum Blue Nanoring Jouornal of the American Chemical Society, 134 (852), 3816-3824 DOI: 10.1021/ja210206z

Reblogged from proofmathisbeautiful  146 notes
cab1729:

‘Schrödinger’s Hat’ Uses Invisibility to Measure Quantum World
Mathematicians now suspect quirks in energy-cloaking metamaterials could be exploited to create powerful quantum probes called “Schrödinger’s hats.”
image caption: A “Schrödinger’s hat” metamaterial could trap a signal (red spike at center) from an atomic particle while leaving the signal’s source undisturbed. Image: A. Greenleaf et al./PNAS

cab1729:

‘Schrödinger’s Hat’ Uses Invisibility to Measure Quantum World

Mathematicians now suspect quirks in energy-cloaking metamaterials could be exploited to create powerful quantum probes called “Schrödinger’s hats.”

image caption: A “Schrödinger’s hat” metamaterial could trap a signal (red spike at center) from an atomic particle while leaving the signal’s source undisturbed. Image: A. Greenleaf et al./PNAS


Making Home a Safer Place

One day homeowners everywhere may be protected from deadly carbon monoxide fumes, thanks to a device invented at NASA’s Langley Research Center. The device uses a new class of low-temperature oxidation catalysts to convert carbon monoxide to non-toxic carbon dioxide at room temperature and also removes formaldehyde from the air. The catalysts initially were developed for research involving carbon dioxide lasers.

Image Credit: NASA

Making Home a Safer Place

One day homeowners everywhere may be protected from deadly carbon monoxide fumes, thanks to a device invented at NASA’s Langley Research Center. The device uses a new class of low-temperature oxidation catalysts to convert carbon monoxide to non-toxic carbon dioxide at room temperature and also removes formaldehyde from the air. The catalysts initially were developed for research involving carbon dioxide lasers.

Image Credit: NASA