Ula-Ula man's island

RSS

Posts tagged with "arxiv"

Jan 3
Searching the Internet for evidence of time travelersTime travel has captured the public imagination for much of the past century, but little has been done to actually search for time travelers. Here, three implementations of Internet searches for time travelers are described, all seeking a prescient mention of information not previously available. The first search covered prescient content placed on the Internet, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific terms in tweets on Twitter. The second search examined prescient inquiries submitted to a search engine, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific search terms submitted to a popular astronomy web site. The third search involved a request for a direct Internet communication, either by email or tweet, pre-dating to the time of the inquiry. Given practical verifiability concerns, only time travelers from the future were investigated. No time travelers were discovered. Although these negative results do not disprove time travel, given the great reach of the Internet, this search is perhaps the most comprehensive to date.
(via ulaulaman space)

Searching the Internet for evidence of time travelers

Time travel has captured the public imagination for much of the past century, but little has been done to actually search for time travelers. Here, three implementations of Internet searches for time travelers are described, all seeking a prescient mention of information not previously available. The first search covered prescient content placed on the Internet, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific terms in tweets on Twitter. The second search examined prescient inquiries submitted to a search engine, highlighted by a comprehensive search for specific search terms submitted to a popular astronomy web site. The third search involved a request for a direct Internet communication, either by email or tweet, pre-dating to the time of the inquiry. Given practical verifiability concerns, only time travelers from the future were investigated. No time travelers were discovered. Although these negative results do not disprove time travel, given the great reach of the Internet, this search is perhaps the most comprehensive to date.

(via ulaulaman space)

Aug 6

The Fate of the Quantum

via @tanzmax

Although the suspicion that quantum mechanics is emergent has been lingering for a long time, only now we begin to understand how a bridge between classical and quantum mechanics might be squared with Bell’s inequalities and other conceptual obstacles. Here, it is shown how mappings can be formulated that relate quantum systems to classical systems. By generalizing these ideas, one gets quite general models in which quantum mechanics and classical mechanics can merge. It is helpful to have some good model examples such as string theory. It is suggested that notions such as ‘super determinism’ and ‘conspiracy’ should be looked at much more carefully than in the, by now, standard arguments.

by Gerard ‘t Hooft

Enumeration of octagonal tilings
via postscrip

Enumeration of octagonal tilings

via postscrip

The Rectangle Galaxy
False-color image of LEDA 074886 taken with Subaru Telescope’s Suprime-Cam. Contrast enhanced to show central disk structure.Image credit: Graham et al.
The discover will be published on The Astrophysical Journal. You can read the preprint on arXiv:LEDA 074886: A remarkable rectangular-looking galaxy by Alister Graham, Lee Spitler, Duncan Forbes, Thorsten Lisker, Ben Moore, Joachim Janz
We report the discovery of an interesting and rare, rectangular-shaped galaxy. At a distance of 21 Mpc, the dwarf galaxy LEDA 074886 has an absolute R-band magnitude of -17.3 mag. Adding to this galaxy’s intrigue is the presence of an embedded, edge-on stellar disk (of extent $2 R_{e,disk} = 12 arcsec = 1.2 kpc$ ) for which Forbes et al. reported $V_rot/sigma ~ 1.4$. We speculate that this galaxy may be the remnant of two (nearly edge-one) merged disk galaxies in which the initial gas was driven inward and subsequently formed the inner disk, while the stars at larger radii effectively experienced a dissipationless merger event resulting in this ‘emerald cut galaxy’ having very boxy isophotes with $a_4/a = -0.05$ to $-0.08$ from 3 to 5 kpc. This galaxy suggests that knowledge from simulations of both ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ galaxy mergers may need to be combined to properly understand the various paths that galaxy evolution can take, with a particular relevance to blue elliptical galaxies.

The Rectangle Galaxy

False-color image of LEDA 074886 taken with Subaru Telescope’s Suprime-Cam. Contrast enhanced to show central disk structure.
Image credit: Graham et al.
The discover will be published on The Astrophysical Journal. You can read the preprint on arXiv:
LEDA 074886: A remarkable rectangular-looking galaxy by Alister Graham, Lee Spitler, Duncan Forbes, Thorsten Lisker, Ben Moore, Joachim Janz
We report the discovery of an interesting and rare, rectangular-shaped galaxy. At a distance of 21 Mpc, the dwarf galaxy LEDA 074886 has an absolute R-band magnitude of -17.3 mag. Adding to this galaxy’s intrigue is the presence of an embedded, edge-on stellar disk (of extent $2 R_{e,disk} = 12 arcsec = 1.2 kpc$ ) for which Forbes et al. reported $V_rot/sigma ~ 1.4$. We speculate that this galaxy may be the remnant of two (nearly edge-one) merged disk galaxies in which the initial gas was driven inward and subsequently formed the inner disk, while the stars at larger radii effectively experienced a dissipationless merger event resulting in this ‘emerald cut galaxy’ having very boxy isophotes with $a_4/a = -0.05$ to $-0.08$ from 3 to 5 kpc. This galaxy suggests that knowledge from simulations of both ‘wet’ and ‘dry’ galaxy mergers may need to be combined to properly understand the various paths that galaxy evolution can take, with a particular relevance to blue elliptical galaxies.
Mar 7

Animation of White Dwarf Gravitational Wave Merger

This artist concept depicts two white dwarfs called RX J0806.3+1527 or J0806, swirling closer together, traveling in excess of a million miles per hour. As their orbit gets smaller and smaller, leading up to a merger, the system should release more and more energy in gravitational waves. This particular pair might have the smallest orbit of any known binary system. They complete an orbit in 321.5 seconds - barely more than five minutes.
News: New Fuel for the Type Ia Supernova Debate | Press release | preprint by Carles Badenes, Dan Maoz
We use multi-epoch spectroscopy of about 4000 white dwarfs in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey to constrain the properties of the Galactic population of binary white dwarf systems and calculate their merger rate. With a Monte Carlo code, we model the distribution of DRVmax, the maximum radial velocity shift between exposures of the same star, as a function of the binary fraction within 0.05 AU, fbin, and the power-law index in the separation distribution at the end of the common envelope phase, alpha. Although there is some degeneracy between fbin and alpha, the the fifteen high DRVmax systems that we find constrain the combination of these parameters, which determines a white dwarf merger rate per unit stellar mass of 1.4(+3.4,-1.0)e-13 /yr/Msun (1-sigma limits). This is remarkably similar to the measured rate of Type Ia supernovae per unit stellar mass in Milky-Way-like Sbc galaxies. The rate of super-Chandrasekhar mergers is only 1.0(+1.6,-0.6)e-14 /yr/Msun. We conclude that there are not enough close binary white dwarf systems to reproduce the observed Type Ia SN rate in the ‘classic’ double degenerate super-Chandrasekhar scenario. On the other hand, if sub-Chandrasekhar mergers can lead to Type Ia SNe, as recently suggested by some studies, they could make a major contribution to the overall Type Ia SN rate. Although unlikely, we cannot rule out contamination of our sample by M-dwarf binaries or non-Gaussian errors. These issues will be clarified in the near future by completing the follow-up of all 15 high DRVmax systems.
A Stellar-Mass Black Hole in Andromeda
This image shows the central region of the Andromeda galaxy in X-rays, where the newly discovered ULX outshines all other sources.
Image: Landessternwarte Tautenburg, XMM-Newton, MPEPress release | Jason Major for Universe Today | preprint on arXiv

A Stellar-Mass Black Hole in Andromeda

This image shows the central region of the Andromeda galaxy in X-rays, where the newly discovered ULX outshines all other sources.
Image: Landessternwarte Tautenburg, XMM-Newton, MPE

Press release | Jason Major for Universe Today | preprint on arXiv
Waterworld
I extract the two plots of the figure from The Flat Transmission Spectrum of the Super-Earth GJ1214b from Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, a preprint in which Zachory K. Berta and collegues argued that the observations about GJ1214b, a super-Earth discovered in 2009, could be explained supposing the planet be a waterworld.
More details in this great post by Phil Plait

Waterworld
I extract the two plots of the figure from The Flat Transmission Spectrum of the Super-Earth GJ1214b from Wide Field Camera 3 on the Hubble Space Telescope, a preprint in which Zachory K. Berta and collegues argued that the observations about GJ1214b, a super-Earth discovered in 2009, could be explained supposing the planet be a waterworld.
More details in this great post by Phil Plait

scholasticahq:

arXiv Integration with Scholastica

Scholastica now enables easy arXiv integration!

We’re been reading (here and here and here) about the serious need for a way for journals to easily plug-in to the existing and trusted science infrasture that’s already out there, namely arXiv.org, so the three of us spent last week developing arXiv integration for Scholastica (see the video for more).

We are open-sourcing the arXiv Ruby gem we built (which is a partial wrapper to the arXiv API), and will continue contributing code to the really awesome arXiv project. Also, thanks to Scott Morrison and Christian Schaffner for their very helpful feedback during the development process.

As journals use this new feature, we’re looking forward to hearing how (and if) they want to automate putting the journal-branded version of the manuscript back on arXiv (e.g. open access journals will probably want this task automated, while journals who depend on subscription revenues probably will want different behavior).

We look forward to your thoughts in the comments, or drop us a line if you want to chat more in depth – we’re always looking for feedback!

Feb 9
Quantum Cheshire Cats by Yakir Aharonov, Sandu Popescu, Paul Skrzypczyk
In this paper we present a quantum Cheshire cat. In a pre- and post-selected experiment we find the cat in one place, and the smile in another. The cat is a photon, while the smile is it’s circular polarisation.
And the introduction of the paper:
‘All right,’ said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone. ‘Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,’ thought Alice, ’but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!’
No wonder Alice is surprised. In real life, assuming that cats do indeed smile, then the smile is a property of the cat – it makes no sense to think of a smile without a cat. And this goes for almost all physical properties. The polarisation is a property of a photon, it makes no sense to have a polarisation without a photon. Yet, as we will show here, in the interesting way of quantum mechanics, a photon polarisation may exist where there is no photon at all. At least this is the story that quantum mechanics tells via pre- and post-selected measurements.
(via Focus)

Quantum Cheshire Cats by Yakir Aharonov, Sandu Popescu, Paul Skrzypczyk

In this paper we present a quantum Cheshire cat. In a pre- and post-selected experiment we find the cat in one place, and the smile in another. The cat is a photon, while the smile is it’s circular polarisation.
And the introduction of the paper:
‘All right,’ said the Cat; and this time it vanished quite slowly, beginning with the end of the tail, and ending with the grin, which remained some time after the rest of it had gone. ‘Well! I’ve often seen a cat without a grin,’ thought Alice, ’but a grin without a cat! It’s the most curious thing I ever saw in my life!’

No wonder Alice is surprised. In real life, assuming that cats do indeed smile, then the smile is a property of the cat – it makes no sense to think of a smile without a cat. And this goes for almost all physical properties. The polarisation is a property of a photon, it makes no sense to have a polarisation without a photon. Yet, as we will show here, in the interesting way of quantum mechanics, a photon polarisation may exist where there is no photon at all. At least this is the story that quantum mechanics tells via pre- and post-selected measurements.
(via Focus)
Sculpting oscillators with light within a nonlinear quantum fluid by G. Tosi, G. Christmann, N. G. Berloff, P. Tsotsis, T. Gao, Z. Hatzopoulos, P. G. Savvidis, J. J. BaumbergSeeing macroscopic quantum states directly remains an elusive goal. Particles with boson symmetry can condense into such quantum fluids producing rich physical phenomena as well as proven potential for interferometric devices. However direct imaging of such quantum states is only fleetingly possible in high-vacuum ultracold atomic condensates, and not in superconductors. Recent condensation of solid state polariton quasiparticles, built from mixing semiconductor excitons with microcavity photons, offers monolithic devices capable of supporting room temperature quantum states that exhibit superfluid behaviour. Here we use microcavities on a semiconductor chip supporting two-dimensional polariton condensates to directly visualise the formation of a spontaneously oscillating quantum fluid. This system is created on the fly by injecting polaritons at two or more spatially-separated pump spots. Although oscillating at tuneable THz-scale frequencies, a simple optical microscope can be used to directly image their stable archetypal quantum oscillator wavefunctions in real space. The self-repulsion of polaritons provides a solid state quasiparticle that is so nonlinear as to modify its own potential. Interference in time and space reveals the condensate wavepackets arise from non-equilibrium solitons. Control of such polariton condensate wavepackets demonstrates great potential for integrated semiconductor-based condensate devices.Paper published on Nature Physics, available on arXivSee also the press release and Alex Knapp’s articleIn fugure: Spatially-mapped polariton condensate wavefunctions

Sculpting oscillators with light within a nonlinear quantum fluid by G. Tosi, G. Christmann, N. G. Berloff, P. Tsotsis, T. Gao, Z. Hatzopoulos, P. G. Savvidis, J. J. Baumberg

Seeing macroscopic quantum states directly remains an elusive goal. Particles with boson symmetry can condense into such quantum fluids producing rich physical phenomena as well as proven potential for interferometric devices. However direct imaging of such quantum states is only fleetingly possible in high-vacuum ultracold atomic condensates, and not in superconductors. Recent condensation of solid state polariton quasiparticles, built from mixing semiconductor excitons with microcavity photons, offers monolithic devices capable of supporting room temperature quantum states that exhibit superfluid behaviour. Here we use microcavities on a semiconductor chip supporting two-dimensional polariton condensates to directly visualise the formation of a spontaneously oscillating quantum fluid. This system is created on the fly by injecting polaritons at two or more spatially-separated pump spots. Although oscillating at tuneable THz-scale frequencies, a simple optical microscope can be used to directly image their stable archetypal quantum oscillator wavefunctions in real space. The self-repulsion of polaritons provides a solid state quasiparticle that is so nonlinear as to modify its own potential. Interference in time and space reveals the condensate wavepackets arise from non-equilibrium solitons. Control of such polariton condensate wavepackets demonstrates great potential for integrated semiconductor-based condensate devices.
Paper published on Nature Physics, available on arXiv
See also the press release and Alex Knapp’s article

In fugure: Spatially-mapped polariton condensate wavefunctions