The Exploration of Hot Nuclear Matter: STAR and PHENIX detectors
(A) The STAR detector has a time-projection chamber (TPC), which is essentially a three-dimensional digital camera to record trajectories of particles produced in each collision. Surrounding detectors identify hadrons and tag high-momentum electrons. STAR has large acceptance and is thus well suited to study multiparticle correlations and collisions at lower energies.
(B) The PHENIX detector has two spectrometers to measure photons, electrons, and hadrons at angles near 90°; one is visible at left (Spec.). There are also two muon spectrometers in the beam direction; these detect decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. A sample event display is shown on the right side of each detector.
Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory

The Exploration of Hot Nuclear Matter: STAR and PHENIX detectors

(A) The STAR detector has a time-projection chamber (TPC), which is essentially a three-dimensional digital camera to record trajectories of particles produced in each collision. Surrounding detectors identify hadrons and tag high-momentum electrons. STAR has large acceptance and is thus well suited to study multiparticle correlations and collisions at lower energies.
(B) The PHENIX detector has two spectrometers to measure photons, electrons, and hadrons at angles near 90°; one is visible at left (Spec.). There are also two muon spectrometers in the beam direction; these detect decays of hadrons containing charm and bottom quarks. A sample event display is shown on the right side of each detector.

Credit: Brookhaven National Laboratory