Ula-Ula man's island

Oct 01

Uncle Scrooge by Luciano Bottaro

Uncle Scrooge by Luciano Bottaro

(Source: duckcomicsrevue.blogspot.it)

Sep 28

Spectra of the Sun, Sirius and several elements, from The principles of light and color by Edwin Babbitt (1878).
via scientificillustration, nemfrog

Spectra of the Sun, Sirius and several elements, from The principles of light and color by Edwin Babbitt (1878).

via scientificillustration, nemfrog

Sep 24

Expedition 42’s poster via @disinformatico @AstroSamantha

Expedition 42’s poster via @disinformatico @AstroSamantha

(Source: nasa.gov)

Sep 23

The Odd Trio
The Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn’s moons that couldn’t be more different from each other! As the largest of the three, Tethys (image center) is round and has a variety of terrains across its surface. Meanwhile, Hyperion (to the upper-left of Tethys) is the “wild one” with a chaotic spin and Prometheus (lower-left) is a tiny moon that busies itself sculpting the F ring.
To learn more about the surface of Tethys (660 miles, or 1,062 kilometers across), see PIA17164. More on the chaotic spin of Hyperion (168 miles, or 270 kilometers across) can be found at PIA07683. And discover more about the role of Prometheus (53 miles, or 86 kilometers across) in shaping the F ring in PIA12786.
This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 1 degree above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 14, 2014.
The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (1.9 million kilometers) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 22 degrees. Image scale is 7 miles (11 kilometers) per pixel.
The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.
Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

The Odd Trio

The Cassini spacecraft captures a rare family photo of three of Saturn’s moons that couldn’t be more different from each other! As the largest of the three, Tethys (image center) is round and has a variety of terrains across its surface. Meanwhile, Hyperion (to the upper-left of Tethys) is the “wild one” with a chaotic spin and Prometheus (lower-left) is a tiny moon that busies itself sculpting the F ring.
To learn more about the surface of Tethys (660 miles, or 1,062 kilometers across), see PIA17164. More on the chaotic spin of Hyperion (168 miles, or 270 kilometers across) can be found at PIA07683. And discover more about the role of Prometheus (53 miles, or 86 kilometers across) in shaping the F ring in PIA12786.
This view looks toward the sunlit side of the rings from about 1 degree above the ringplane. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on July 14, 2014. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 1.2 million miles (1.9 million kilometers) from Tethys and at a Sun-Tethys-spacecraft, or phase, angle of 22 degrees. Image scale is 7 miles (11 kilometers) per pixel.
The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

Sep 18

And I’m not happy with all the analyses that go with just the classical theory, because nature isn’t classical, damrnit, and if you want to make a simulation of nature, you’d better make it quantum mechanical, and by golly it’s a wonderful problem, because it doesn’t look so easy.
Richard Feynman from Simulating Physics with Computers (pdf), introductory lecture at the first conference on Physics and Computation at MIT, 1981

And I’m not happy with all the analyses that go with just the classical theory, because nature isn’t classical, damrnit, and if you want to make a simulation of nature, you’d better make it quantum mechanical, and by golly it’s a wonderful problem, because it doesn’t look so easy.

Richard Feynman from Simulating Physics with Computers (pdf), introductory lecture at the first conference on Physics and Computation at MIT, 1981

Sep 16

by Dean Ellis via @Havocus
Mathematics, chemistry, universe in one illustration (cover of 1, 2, 3 Infinity by George Gamow

by Dean Ellis via @Havocus

Mathematics, chemistry, universe in one illustration (cover of 1, 2, 3 Infinity by George Gamow

(Source: monolithzine)

Women Who Conquered the Comics World
Image: Rose O’Neill said her baby-like creatures she called the Kewpies, seen here in the April 1925 Ladies Home Journal, visited her in a dream.
Via the State Historical Society of Missouri

Women Who Conquered the Comics World

Image: Rose O’Neill said her baby-like creatures she called the Kewpies, seen here in the April 1925 Ladies Home Journal, visited her in a dream.
Via the State Historical Society of Missouri

Sep 14

[video]

Sep 12

Rokambol News is better than a real newspaper!

Rokambol News is better than a real newspaper!

(Source: jaidefinichon, via thereisnofinalnumber)

Leonard Susskind about the Universe
You are a victim of your own neural architecture which doesn’t permit you to imagine anything outside of three dimensions. Even two dimensions. People know they can’t visualise four or five dimensions, but they think they can close their eyes and see two dimensions. But they can’t. When you close your eyes and try to see two dimensions you’ll always see a surface embedded in three dimensions.
Is there something special about three dimensions? No. There is something special about your neural architecture. You evolved in a world where everything inside your brain is hooked up and geared to be able to see three dimensions and nothing else.

Leonard Susskind about the Universe

You are a victim of your own neural architecture which doesn’t permit you to imagine anything outside of three dimensions. Even two dimensions. People know they can’t visualise four or five dimensions, but they think they can close their eyes and see two dimensions. But they can’t. When you close your eyes and try to see two dimensions you’ll always see a surface embedded in three dimensions.
Is there something special about three dimensions? No. There is something special about your neural architecture. You evolved in a world where everything inside your brain is hooked up and geared to be able to see three dimensions and nothing else.